'Ten Minutes Late for Reality' by Lou Morris (c) 1988, 1989, 1991, 2002, 2015. Three:

Three:

   "Okay, roger wilco niner seven oh--Oh, what the hell is
that?!"

                                 - Last outgoing message
from a small corporate jet
flying over the eastern
Pennsylvania Appalachian
mountain range.


   Awkwardly, a small humanoid-made meteorite entered the
Earth's atmosphere, fell into the clouds, and collided with a
small corporate aircraft carrying seven passengers and a
small pet turtle.  The remaining half of the flaming jetliner
hurled itself down into a mountain ravine, killing both the
captain and the co-pilot.  The satellite, minus a few small
bits and pieces, silently continued its predetermined course
into the side of a cliff a few mountaintops over from the
plane crash.  Three of the small bits and pieces, propelled
by the resulting fuel tank explosion, took a vacation flight
to southeastern Bucks County, Pennsylvania, while the rest of
the radioactive chunks littered themselves around the jet
wreckage.


   Corbin Wick walked barefoot outside into his Cassville
backyard, munching on half of a tuna fish and mustard salad
sandwich.  He looked around for the small falling piece that
he thought he saw from his dinning room window just a second
ago.  Oh, there it is, next to the lawn shed.  He knelt over
to peer at it... What is it?
   It was a small burnt chunk of rock.  Also very hot, so he
dropped it as quickly as possible.  He went inside for a
pitcher of water then returned a minute later.  He slowly
poured the water over it, waving away the steam.
   After the rock had sufficiently cooled, Corbin picked it
up again to examine it.  It was a rock, all right.  He turned
it over--a computer chip of some sort stuck out from the
bottom, scarred but relatively unharmed.  Hmn...
   He took the rock down into his basement, quickly noting
that both his parents must've gone out shopping or something;
a note taped to the television set confirmed his suspicion.
   Once in the basement, he placed the rock, top down, onto
his sparse work bench.  He then grabbed an electric drill,
inserted a small bit, and carefully began to drill away tiny
pieces of rock from the chip.  An hour later, the computer
chip was free.
   It looked like a frequency microchip to him.  Glad I
majored in electronics, Corbin thought to himself.  
Definitely a frequency chip... Too bad I don't have a radio
controlled car or something similar to test it out.  Wait a
second, he thought, pulling out a remote control garage door
opener from his pocket.  This could do the trick; it uses the
same principle of different frequencies, so the chip just
might be made to work.  All I have to do is replace the
garage door chip with this frequency microcircuit and it
might work.
   You know, he thought with a hopeful smile, thinking back
to book he read a few days ago, I might just be inventing a
time machine.
   Then his parents came home.


   The second and smallest piece landed on some fat guy's
hamburger at a company costume party picnic.  Unknowingly,
the large man, dressed as a fat super-hero of his own design,
ate the contaminated burger and then, a few minutes later,
became ravenously hungry.  So he ate again, and again, and
again.  Soon the picnic food was all gone, so he waddled
across the street to the local 11-7 convenience store.  Along
the way, he became so overwhelmingly hungry that he couldn't
control himself any longer and had to stop and munch on a
stop sign.  To his complete surprise, the sign was quite
tasty and sustained his hunger long enough to cross the
street and enter 11-7.


   The third piece fell into the Clam Creek nuclear power
station of central Pennsylvania and caused a minor meltdown,
injuring none save for a small forest bat.